Manga Paper If You’re Outside Japan

Manga Paper If You’re Outside Japan

When you first started drawing manga, did you grab a few sheets from the printer stack? I know I did. Tsk, and a tsk. We didn’t know better then, but now we do. The type of paper you use to create your manga and comics makes a difference in line quality, erasings, and marker bleeds. Manga paper is nothing more than comic book or manuscript paper that’s thicker and more absorbent than regular printer paper. They can be expensive, but here’s a list from online retailers who’ll give you a deal.

Brand / Paper Type # of Sheets DickBlick Jerry’s Artarama Blue Line Pro Comic Artist Supplies Akadot Deleter Japanimation
Manga Art Boardz (150×220 mm) 25 $10.00
Manga Art Boardz (150×220 mm) 100 $35.00
Manga Art Paper #90 (8 ¼ x 11 ¾ in) 25 $8.96
Manga Art Paper #80 (8 ¼ x 11 ¾ in) 25 $9.86
Manga Art Paper #90 (10 x 14 ¼ in) 25 $14.36
Manga Art Paper #80 (10 x 14 ¼ in) 25 $15.26
Canson Illustration/Comic Board (38 x 10 in) 3 $5.32
Canson Illustration/Comic Board (16 x 20 in) 5 $14.49
Canson Illustration/Comic Board (20 x 30 in) 5 $24.89
Canson Comic Book Art Boards (11 x 17 in) 24 $13.67
Canson Manga Art Boards (10 x 14 ¼ in) 15 $6.84
Deleter Comic Book Paper 110kg A4 (182x257mm) 40 $5.91 $8.89
Deleter Comic Book Paper 110kg B4 (220x310mm) 40 $8.86 $13.29
Deleter Comic Book Paper 135kg A4 (182x257mm) 40 $6.23 $9.39
Deleter Comic Book Paper 135kg B4 (220x310mm) 40 $9.52 $15.09
Canson Paper for A5 Book Comic Manuscript Paper 3 $5.50
Canson Paper for B5 Book Comic Manuscript Paper 3 $6.00

For the digital copy of this post, please click here: Where to Get Manga Paper.

Other artists who’ve written about using manga paper and where to get them are:

Jamie Lynn Lano (former Prince of Tennis manga assistant) recommends 3 kinds of paper at http://www.jamieism.com/1883/prince-of-tennis/become-mangaka-part-2-learn-tools .

Manga Tutorials recommends paper from Akadot Retail and Blue Line Pro at http://www.mangatutorials.com/2010/all-about-manga-paper/ .

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Manga Assistant’s Dream Realized: The Princess of Tennis Review

Manga Assistant’s Dream Realized: The Princess of Tennis Review

When I was 13, I wanted to be a manga creator. Between college and Japan, I forgot that dream. After reading Jamie Lynn Lano’s The Princess of Tennis, that 15-year-old dream cried out and I realized why: Lano never forgot her dream and became a manga assistant for Takeshi Konomi’s The Prince of Tennis, or TeniPuri by some fans.

Lano’s journey starts with already living in Japan for 4 years as an English teacher before applying to Konomi’s call for manga assistants. Throughout the book, Lano not only talks about how manga is made (it’s less technical than I thought) but also the ups and downs of being a 6-foot-1 foreign woman in Japan.

The Princess of Tennis is an easy and fun read. Lano keeps the tone light and friendly, and when she turns to darker themes–the invisible red tape for foreigners, real Japanese customs, and women’s 1950’s role in Japanese culture–Lano always remembers that this true story is a happy one, minus the tinted glasses.

While Lano makes her book accessible for all readers, The Princess of Tennis best fits otaku and aspiring manga creators and editors. She uses Japanese words and emoticons that anyone can find in a manga. For readers outside of the manga-reading audience, this book comes off as a borderline Young Adult novel or fanfiction, especially when the grammatical errors are considered. Because Lano’s voice and amiable nature is consistent, readers can forgive the missing words, incorrect punctuation marks, and passive sentences.

As with many books about Japan, The Princess of Tennis uses many Japanese words. Some might find it charming, but I believe that if a book is for the English-reading community, it should stay in English. I wouldn’t say, “Konomi Teacher”. Even “Mr. Konomi” is passable. Still, I’d just omit the word. In the West, using someone’s last name is also a sign of respect. Untranslated Japanese words with simple English meanings–“ohayo” (“Good morning”), “hajimemashite” (“Nice to meet you”), and “ganbare” (“Good luck” or “Do your best”)–are still in the book. I think I removed every romanized word with corrector ink just to polish the text.

Aside from the mistakes, The Princess of Tennis was entertaining and inspirational for me. Remember my dream of becoming a manga creator? Maybe my TeniPuri call is waiting for me to answer.

The Princess of Tennis: The True Story of an American Manga Assistant

I finally got my copy of The Princess of Tennis from Jamie Lynn Lano!

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There aren’t many stories (if any) about Western manga assistants working in Japan. Jamie Lynn Lano tells all in this book and on her blog, Jamieism.com. You can buy  The Princess of Tennis: The true story of working as a mangaka’s assistant in Japanon Amazon.

Also, you can help Jamie get to San Diego Comic Con through http://www.gofundme.com/9v7x64.

American Prince of Tennis Manga Assistant to go to San Diego Comic Con???

American Prince of Tennis Manga Assistant to go to San Diego Comic Con???

You can help make this headline come true without the question marks!

One of my manga friends, an American manga assistant to the popular Prince of Tennis, needs your help! She’s trying to get to the annual San Diego Comic Con, the biggest pop culture convention in the continental U.S. In order to get there, she needs to find some funds.

This is what she wrote on her website and Facebook:

“I was invited to speak at San Diego Comic Con in July!!

The thing is that I need your help. I can only spare the time to come for the one day that I’m invited to speak, what with all of the chaos going on in my life, but I’ll fight hell or high water to be able to share my experiences with everyone. I just need some help paying for it. You know that I come from a poor family, and working for a mangaka didn’t pay all that well, nor does book writing (I wish that it did!).

But I don’t want the money to stand in my way. Instead of a corporation paying my way, I’m hoping that the fans will. That everyone who has heard my stories will chip in just a little bit.

I need your help, let’s help each other, ne?

http://www.gofundme.com/9v7x64

Donate anything, even your pocket change! It’s a good opportunity for Americans to learn how to break into the manga in Japan Land!

http://www.gofundme.com/9v7x64